Review: The Invisible Leader in Montgomery 



Synopsis:

There was a powerful invisible leader of consequential significance in Montgomery during the bus affair, December 1955-December 1956. The invisible leader was unknown to the public. Visible operatives executed the strategy of their leader, who directed activities from behind the scene. The chief subordinate of the invisible leader was Martin Luther King, Jr. King was hand-picked by the invisible leader because of recognized qualities. The belief that an invisible leader existed surfaced five weeks into the bus undertaking. 

City leaders, and many citizens, were of the opinion that the youthful newcomer to Montgomery lacked the community status, credibility, or experience to garner a following of fifty thousand residents overnight and launch such a crusade. Politicians in Montgomery ruled out seasoned leaders in the community of the oppressed, E. D. Nixon and Rufus Lewis, as the boss to whom the young newcomer answered.

The efforts of city leaders and supporters to identify and apprehend the invisible leader were unsuccessful. Several visitors to Montgomery concluded that an invisible leader existed, annotating their position in writing. Various concerns forced the consequential personality to function in the capacity of the invisible leader, while subordinates publicly implemented tasks. 

The bus affair lasted over one year, but the invisible leader went uncaptured. The chief subordinate of the invisible leader, young King, ascended to fame during the axial bus affair. The invisible leader who functioned and commanded from behind the scene remained in obscurity.

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

The Invisible Leader in Montgomery by Wally G. Vaughn took me pack into the heart of history. A time when the black people were struggling with being mistreated by whites. Everyone is a human being yet the skin tones set them apart. Whites did everything to keep blacks out of their circles. Separation of schools, different drinking fountains, and giving up one’s bus seat for a white person. Cruelty like nothing we have seen. Despite their horrible treatment a leader rose among them. Teaching them violence doesn’t end the cruelty. They continued to use non-violentapproaches and it seemed to work. People were taking notice. Blacks were rising up to defend themselves. Martin Luther King Jr. was the man that would make his people proud. Not black and not white, but both people proud. A true leader who made significant outcomes for those suffering. Wally G. Vaughn has created this historical piece, diving readers into the mess of that time. I enjoyed reading this book. I believe that the writer has done an excellent job showing readers the facts. I found it quite interesting to read. Overall, I recommend The Invisible Leader in Montgomery to all. 

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