Review: Of Our Own Device

Synopsis:

What do you do when you realize that the American Dream you have been working for so hard is not enough if it will be yours and yours alone? And that what you are told to do will destroy the only true friend you have ever had?
Summer of 1985. Jack Smith is a rookie CIA case officer posted at the American Embassy in Moscow. Despite his gregarious nature, Jack is a lonely man: not only is he a reluctant spy, he is also gay. When he meets Eton Volkonsky, a talented nuclear physics student, Jack’s bosses instruct him to develop the Russian as a future agent. Their friendship deepens, and Jack is torn between his suspicion that Eton and friends are with the KGB and his attraction to the man. But he continues telling himself and his bosses that he is just doing his job, developing his agent. Only when he leaves Russia does Jack admit that he has been fooling himself all the while. He takes on assignments in various countries, with a hope that eventually they will get him back to Moscow.
As introspection and growing doubts about what he does for living torment Jack, the world is buffeted by a whirlwind of dramatic events – diplomatic and spy wars, the rise of AIDS, the Chernobyl catastrophe, the war in Afghanistan and the disintegration of the communist bloc.

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

Of Our Own Device by M.K. South is a stunning tale. One that features the Cold War. I was instantly hooked and intrigued by this writer’s talent. Every page was well-written. M.K. South brilliantly brought this novel to life. Impressive. Fast-paced, thrilling, and an unforgettable story. Spies, politics, love, and much more can be found inside Of Our Device. The main character’s increasing situation with a particular character was fascinating to watch unfold. Originally sent as an assignment, Jack ends up with more than just doing work related stuff. His attachment towards Eton is intense. I recommend this book, to all who love action and espionage thrillers. Plus, this contains male and male romance. Overall, an engaging read. 

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