Review: Look At You Now






Synopsis:

CHICAGO TRIBUNE BESTSELLER – For readers of Orange Is the New Black and The Glass Castle, a riveting memoir about a lifelong secret and a girl finding strength in the most unlikely place.

In 1979, Liz Pryor is a seventeen-year-old girl from a good family in the wealthy Chicago suburbs. Halfway through her senior year of high school, she discovers that she is pregnant–a fact her parents are determined to keep a secret from her friends, siblings, and community forever. One snowy January day, after driving across three states, her mother drops her off at what Liz thinks is a Catholic home for unwed mothers–but which is, in truth, a locked government-run facility for delinquent and impoverished pregnant teenage girls.

In the cement-block residence, Liz is alone and terrified, a fish out of water–a girl from a privileged, sheltered background living amid tough, street-savvy girls who come from the foster care system or juvenile detention. But over the next six months, isolated and in involuntary hiding from everyone she knows, Liz develops a surprising bond with the other girls and begins to question everything she once held true. Told with tenderness, humor, and an open heart, Look at You Now is a deeply moving story about the most vulnerable moments in our lives–and how a willingness to trust ourselves can permanently change who we are and how we see the world.

Rating: 4-stars

Review:

Look at You Now by Liz Pryor is well-written. A memoir that is sad. Secretive, heartbreaking, and coming of age. I am happy that the parents nor the writer opted for an abortion. That made my heart happy. My heart still poured out to the baby she left behind…why, do pregnant girls get rid of their children? Why? I still can’t understand it. Then, the same girl goes on to have more kids later in life. Why not go back for the child she gave up? I felt frustrated, angry, and emotional. So many questions on what life did her abandoned child live…did it go to a good home, was the child safe? Then, I wondered did the woman even care? She didn’t even want to look at the child. I felt so disconnected from this woman. Her story tore at my heart. I have been in foster homes. Most kids don’t go to good homes. Look at You Now was devasting to read. I didn’t enjoy the journey. However, my feelings should not affect on whether this book was worthy of reading. It was well-told. The writer’s voice was done well. The writing was visual. Engaging. 

Advertisements