Review: Bits and Peaces 

Synopsis:

BITS AND PEACES could leave you thinking that what people believe in their own minds might be more powerful than reality; of course, members of all races and ethnicities are equal; don’t screw with the wrong guy; or it ain’t over till it’s over. 

The first section is comprised of six fiction stories of varying lengths that include primary characters such as Joey, a middle-aged man who believes he is en route to breaking the major league baseball lifetime home run record in softball batting practice; Michael Damsky, a fifty-year-old man pushed out of his twenty-one-year professional job, who continues to catch the same train to work each morning; and Richard Colucci, the retiree who returns to New York for his fiftieth high school reunion, worried whether anyone will recognize him, and if he’ll be asked to recount what he’d done all those years. 

Section II of Bits And Peaces consists of seven fiction stories narrated in first person by a character named Mitchell Graye – the author’s alter ego – each story about an unusual person he meets, his interaction with, and reaction to them. The characters include Amala who dials the wrong number two hours after the ringing in of a new year, seeking her psychiatrist because she wants to kill herself; Mildred, an elderly woman in a White Castle hamburger restaurant who lines up her twenty lipstick cases every thirty minutes, and speaks to nobody; Mel, a man in Panera’s restaurant with a scar down the side of his neck who takes his cell phone outside in any kind of weather each time it rings. 

The third section consists of several essays, including “Mr. Potato Heart,” about how people create their own fantasy version of other people based on what they want or need them to be. This collection of stories is aptly titled “Bits And Peaces,” rather than “Bits And Pieces.” 

Rating: 4.5-stars

Review:

Bits and Peaces by Mitchell Graye is an interesting book. It’s divided into three awesome parts. Part one, is a series of short fictional stories. Each one providing different kinds of characters. It was addictive to read. Never boring. Always caught my attention. The pages went by pretty fast. Before I knew it, I was already in part two. Here, there were more short stories but told in a different way compared to previous ones. I enjoyed the different point-of-view. A lot of action, emotions, and a variety of characters that gives it a refeshing taste. Last but not least, is part three. This section is a collection of short essays. It’s very deep, thought provoking, and interesting. Mitchell Graye spun a ton of short pieces and brilliantly wrapped them into a great book. I’m not usually into short stories or essays but this one was worth every minute of reading. 

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