Review: I’ll See You in Paris by Michelle Gable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

After losing her fiancé in the Vietnam War, nineteen-year-old Laurel Haley takes a job in England, hoping the distance will mend her shattered heart. Laurel expects the pain might lessen but does not foresee the beguiling man she meets or that they’ll go to Paris, where the city’s magic will take over and alter everything Laurel believes about love.

Thirty years later, Laurel’s daughter Annie is newly engaged and an old question resurfaces: who is Annie’s father and what happened to him? Laurel has always been vague about the details and Annie’s told herself it doesn’t matter. But with her impending marriage, Annie has to know everything. Why won’t Laurel tell her the truth?

The key to unlocking Laurel’s secrets starts with a mysterious book about an infamous woman known as the Duchess of Marlborough. Annie’s quest to understand the Duchess, and therefore her own history, takes her from a charming hamlet in the English countryside, to a decaying estate kept behind barbed wire, and ultimately to Paris where answers will be found at last.

Rating: 3-stars

Review:

I’ll See You in Paris by Michelle Gable sounded like an interesting story according to the plot summary. Yet, it was too dragged out and too slow for my taste. The mystery of who was the young woman’s father and when she finds out was just stretched out too much. I wanted there to be more action and more of an emotional journey. Sure, I was able to understand the protagonist’s frustration and determination to find answers. But I really could not connec with her. The ending made me connect to her finally but it was still was not the best.

The plot was heartfelt, sad, and sent me traveling to the past. Secrets and mystery combined to create a story of love, hope, and peace. Women who loss loved ones  are connected by blood. Figuring out the real father of a young proved harder than one thought. There was a promising future for this tale but it fell flat to me. I had to push myself to keep reading it.

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