Review: Conversations with Friends 

Synopsis:

A sharply intelligent novel about two college students and the strange, unexpected connection they forge with a married couple.
Frances is twenty-one years old, cool-headed, and darkly observant. A college student and aspiring writer, she devotes herself to a life of the mind–and to the beautiful and endlessly self-possessed Bobbi, her best friend and comrade-in-arms. Lovers at school, the two young women now perform spoken-word poetry together in Dublin, where a journalist named Melissa spots their potential. Drawn into Melissa’s orbit, Frances is reluctantly impressed by the older woman’s sophisticated home and tall, handsome husband. Private property, Frances believes, is a cultural evil–and Nick, a bored actor who never quite lived up to his potential, looks like patriarchy made flesh. But however amusing their flirtation seems at first, it gives way to a strange intimacy neither of them expect.As Frances tries to keep her life in check, her relationships increasingly resist her control: with Nick, with her difficult and unhappy father, and finally even with Bobbi. Desperate to reconcile herself to the desires and vulnerabilities of her body, Frances’s intellectual certainties begin to yield to something new: a painful and disorienting way of living from moment to moment.
Written with gem-like precision and probing intelligence, Conversations With Friends is wonderfully alive to the pleasures and dangers of youth.” 

Rating: 3-stars

Review:

Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney is a different kind of novel than I’m used to reading. A young woman ends up living a very complicated lifestyle. Her relationships entangle  in ways she didn’t imagine. Going for the moment instead of thinking of all the things that may come of her decisions. Friendship, lust, and love. These are just some of the major themes expressed on the pages. Out of the three characters, Frances is the one I mostly enjoyed following. I didn’t like her going after another woman’s husband…Frances wasn’t easy to relate due to her sexuality preferences. She could go either…man or woman. This wasn’t my favorite read. But it appeared realistic and for that it earned points. I can see three people living lives similar to these characters. I liked how I knew exactly what the characters were thinking. That made this interesting to follow. Overall, it was okay for me. Not one I would highly recommend to others but still worth reading. 

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Review: Losing the Light




Synopsis:

A smart, obsessive debut novel about a young woman studying abroad who becomes caught up in a seductive French world—and a complex web of love and lust.

When thirty-year-old Brooke Thompson unexpectedly runs into a man from her past, she’s plunged headlong into memories she’s long tried to forget about the year she spent in France following a disastrous affair with a professor.

As a newly arrived exchange student in the picturesque city of Nantes, young Brooke develops a deep and complicated friendship with Sophie, a fellow American and stunning blonde, whose golden girl façade hides a precarious emotional fragility. Sophie and Brooke soon become inseparable and find themselves intoxicated by their new surroundings—and each other.

But their lives are forever changed when they meet a sly, stylish French student, Veronique, and her impossibly sexy older cousin, Alex. The cousins draw Sophie and Brooke into an irresistible world of art, money, decadence, and ultimately, a disastrous love triangle that consumes them both. And of the two of them, only one will make it home. 

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

Losing the Light by Andrea Dunlop is an interesting tale that takes readers to France. Here, I met a variety of characters. Their personalities are different as night and day. Two girls with troubles of their own, soon become friends. Not too long afterwards they meet two others. One is a guy and a cousin to the new girl that they meet. Life appears fun, fast, and exciting at first. Then, things happen…by the time it ends, everything will have changed forever. 

Andrea Dunlop created a suspense yet engaging tale. Young women exploring the world and taking each day as it comes and goes. Adulthood is both a fascinating and terrible thing. Losing the Light is full of adventure, romance, and mystery. The charcaters are unforgettable. Their sorrows, joys, and troubles can be felt with every page. I was intrigued from beginning to end. Friends who are opposites, a rich and mysterious man, and a journey of travel and fun ahead. Overall, I enjoyed reading this novel. The words spoke to me and dragged me along with the characters. I recommend Losing the Light to all. 

Review: Closure

Closure: A Novel by [White, Neil A]

 

Synopsis:

A moving coming-of-age tale that follows three young boys through adolescence into adulthood, each trying to make sense of a world turned upside down.

Poland (1939)
The German army sweeps across Poland intent on the destruction of an entire people. In a small Polish town, ten-year-old Piotr Kowalczyk’s idyllic world will be forever destroyed.

Croatia (1944)
Young Dino Mitak flees to the freedom of the West as the communist-led Partisans move ever closer to Zagreb.

Australia (1980)
A small boy, already struggling to cope with the loss of a parent, is confronted by a gruesome murder.

From the tranquil foothills of the Carpathian Mountains in southern Poland, to the Balkans and a simmering feud centuries in the making, to the streets of inner-city Melbourne where histories collide.

These events, generations and worlds apart, are interwoven in a poignant story of grief, hatred, revenge and finally, closure.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Closure by Neil A. White is a brilliant coming of age story that all readers will love. I was glued to the story from page one. Three boys…each one from a different country suffering through loss, grief, and troubled-times. Poland, Croatia, and Australia. It’s hard not to find one’s self drawn to each boy’s story. The danger comes alive. Emotions are formed deeply, creating the connection from readers to the characters. A historical novel that is highly engaging, suspenseful, and intriguing. The plot thickens as the pages are turning. The unknown of terror lies ahead keeps readers guessing. Each of the three boy’s will have the world’s the grew up in lost forever. They will know what pain is and the hardness of life that comes with destruction. Closure is about each character finding a way to close the darkness of their lives and to move forward with life, hope, and love. Neil A. White’s writing is stunning. I look forward to reading more books by him in the future. Overall, I recommend Closure to readers everywhere.