Review: Almost Human

Synopsis:

Almost Human is a thriller where creatures with the enormous strength and power of a chimpanzee and the intelligence and size of a human are sought out and discovered in a remote compound in equatorial Africa. The special bond between trainers and their animals is central to the story. Drs. Ken Turner and Fred Savage follow rumors of chimp-human hybrids. The scientists want to study the hybrids, but government operatives want to exploit them. The resulting conflicts threaten Turner and Savage’s research and their lives, as well as the lives of many others. Can they stop the murderous onslaught in time?

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

Almost Human by Kenneth L. Decroo is a fascinating thriller. The entire plot hangs onto the theme of: what happens when the line between ape and man is blurred? That question lingers in my mind long after this read. I keep thinking what if…and what will happen if that were indeed a reality. We are already hearing about robots taking over humans in the workforce…what is to say that scientists won’t go so far as to blur the lines between ape and man. 

Almost Human is exciting and terrifying at the same time. The impossible comes possible. Scientists working on experiments that no one really wants to know about…and soon, it will hit the papers. Secrets will come out…and the fear of the unknown will conquer those involved. The plot takes readers to Africa were these experiments occur. Ape-human hybrids…danger is just lurking on every page. The intensity of this wild situation will send readers with nightmares and chills as they explore what happens when the lines become blurred. Kenneth L. Decroo is a talented writer. I was awed and chilled by what his words showed. Interesting scenarios. The characters were brilliant. Both the good and the bad made it believably real. Overall, I recommend Almost Human to readers worldwide. 

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Review: Madame President 



Synopsis:

The harrowing, but triumphant story of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, leader of the Liberian women’s movement, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, and the first democratically elected female president in African history.

When Ellen Johnson Sirleaf won the 2005 Liberian presidential election, she demolished a barrier few thought possible, obliterating centuries of patriarchal rule to become the first female elected head of state in Africa’s history. Madame President is the inspiring, often heartbreaking story of Sirleaf’s evolution from an ordinary Liberian mother of four boys to international banking executive, from a victim of domestic violence to a political icon, from a post-war president to a Nobel Peace Prize winner. 

Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and bestselling author Helene Cooper deftly weaves Sirleaf’s personal story into the larger narrative of the coming of age of Liberian women. The highs and lows of Sirleaf’s life are filled with indelible images; from imprisonment in a jail cell for standing up to Liberia’s military government to addressing the United States Congress, from reeling under the onslaught of the Ebola pandemic to signing a deal with Hillary Clinton when she was still Secretary of State that enshrined American support for Liberia’s future.
Sirleaf’s personality shines throughout this riveting biography. Ultimately, Madame President is the story of Liberia’s greatest daughter, and the universal lessons we can all learn from this “Oracle” of African women.

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

Madame President by Helene Cooper is an inspiring read. Women everywhere will be awed at the work done by one woman, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. She has gone beyond any other woman of her time in a country that mistreated women as objects. Here, I got to follow the brave and clever woman as she rose from just a mother to a president of a nation. Going to prison, suffering like every other woman has done…,yet she managed to rise dispite the hardships that fell upon her. I was amazed. She kept on going even when it might have meant the end for her. Writer, Helene Cooper, has brought Ellen Johnson Sirleaf’s life alive on these pages for All to see. Just when I thought I have seen, heard, and know it all…this book brought out more than just a woman struggling to rise among men of her country. It’s a story of survival, courage, determination as well as breaking barriers. Overall, I recommend this nonfiction piece on one of the most compelling stories of a woman to readers everywhere.

Review: Gods, Empire, & Shifting Trade Routes

 

Synopsis:

In approximately 200 pages, this book seems to describe what 200,000 pages could not come close to adequately holding: the history of the world. Featured in this brief ride through the human condition: why over 40% of the world speaks in tongues descended from an obscure tribe called the Indo-Europeans, how political violence escalated in a three-part ancient republic, the African king whose massive wealth caused inflation when he traveled abroad, the probability that you are personally related to Genghis Khan, how the coming of Islam influenced Java’s shadow theater, how Sub-Saharan Africans were visiting Europe long before Europeans “discovered” Sub-Saharan Africa, the six foot eight giant who collected midgets while also making Russia a great power, Britain’s wars with China over their right to sell illegal drugs, the CIA intervention in order to secure a monopoly for a fruit company, Soviet jokes, and the African World War. Also mentioned is all the stuff you know already: the origins of the major world religions, Ancient Greece and Rome, Charlemagne, the French Revolution, World War One and World War Two, including the part of WWII between China and Japan that had a death toll estimated around 20 million.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Gods, Empire, and Shifting Trade Routes by Matthew Crowe is the book to read. It’s a small nonfiction book that contains history from the beginning to this very time period that we’re in now…Excellent way of condensing all of history into a brief easy to read style. I love the fact that readers can learn more and watch how the four major parts that created the world the way it is, evolve. These four areas are known as religion, politics, economics, and last but not least culture. All of these specific areas are the domination for wat made humans do what they did and still do today. It helped build the social institutions we know. Like our governments. Every part of the world there is some kind of government in existence. Another brilliant part of this book is that it answers the who, what, when and where questions. I love history and this is brilliant. I found words that pop up in my studies since I was in middle school to now in college. The writer, Matthew Crowe, goes on to explains these common terms that are essential to readers’ knowledge of the world and history. Third reason, I am enamoured with this nonfiction piece is that it takes readers deep into the world’s culture and environments. Can you imagine how some of the most magnificent architecture were built and why? Matthew Crowe had a goal in mind and he succeeded in doing just that. I was blown away by all the topics he managed to cover in this brief edition. I hope he creates another edition exploring other parts that were not highlighted within this one so as to cover all parts. Overall, as a history lover, this was one of the best condensed editions of history,that I have run across. Highly recommend Gods, Empire, and Shifting Trade Routes to all.

 

Review: Katambora Sunset

 

Synopsis:

In the 1980s, an era of political turmoil sweeps over Africa, offering opportunity for those who can move with the flow—not always for the better. Among those taking advantage of shifting political alliances are international rhino poachers who begin the rapid eradication of one of Africa’s most magnificent animals for their horns, much sought-after ingredients in Chinese and Vietnamese medicine.

Colin and Annika Somerset manage a photo safari operation on behalf of the local BaTonga people in the remote Zambezi valley. The two have dedicated their lives to wildlife conservation, especially rhinos.

Threatening Colin and Annika’s happiness—and very lives—is Justin Charimba, an old enemy who has his own life ambition: the utter destruction of the Somersets.

Now a member of Zimbabwe’s dreaded 5th Brigade, Charimba exerts his influence over a large swath of land, including the Somerset’s Katambora Safari Ranch. He’s ready to move against Colin and Annika, and if he happens to profit from the deaths of their beloved rhinos, well, that makes revenge all the sweeter.

A rousing Southern African adventure novel reminiscent of Wilbur Smith’s early works, Katambora Sunset brings Rory Johnston’s Katambora trilogy to an exciting close.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

WOW! Katambora Sunset by Rory Johnston is brilliantly stunning. Readers will love this adventure story. A novel that speaks out about poachers and the endangered wildlife. This book set’s readers back in time and on the African continent. It is here, that one couple has dedicated their lives to ensure the wildlife is safe…especially the endangered Rhinos. Poachers are killing them just for their horns. Beautiful harmless animals …killed for their horns to be used for the Chinese and Japanese markets…all for their special medicines.

Rory Johnston brings readers to Africa. The culture and way of life experienced on every page as readers are intrigued by the fast plot is remarkable. One that keeps readers in suspense. Can one couple defeat their enemy by keeping the Rhinos safe or will they all be slaughtered? This story shows readers a sad, realistic and cruel world that we live in…it remind me of another animal killed just for their fins and another animal just for its eggs…Humans can be the world’s worst enemy…not all humans are bad…some are very good…like the Somersets. I loved this powerful read…it will knock readers off their feet and send them deep into the hot wilderness battling to save the Rhinos from being extinct…Overall, I highly recommend Katambora Sunset to readers everywhere.

Review: The Adventures of Charlie Smithers (Book 1)

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Synopsis:

Harry Flashman, step aside, old son. Make way for Charlie Smithers.

The time is the nineteenth century. The place, the Serengeti Plain, where one Charlie Smithers – faithful manservant to the arrogant bone-head, Lord Brampton (with five lines in Debrett, and a hopeless shot to boot) – becomes separated from his master during an unfortunate episode with an angry rhinoceros, thereby launching Charlie on an odyssey into Deepest Darkest Africa, and subsequently into the arms of the beautiful Loiyan…and that’s where the trouble really begins.

Maasai warriors, xenophobic locals, or evil Arab slavers, the two forbidden lovers encounter everything that the unforgiving jungle can throw at them.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

The Adventures of Charlie Smithers in an intriguing and exotic novel. It takes readers deep into it’s plot. A well-developed plot full of action at every turn. Inside of C.W. Lovatt’s story, Charlie Smithers is the man servant of an ignorant lord. He places himself in danger just to protect his lordship. Suffering one injury after another and following the fool who is lord of him, Charlie encounters an adventure of a life time.

C.W. Lovatt’s  novel is adventureous, intriguing, and suspenseful. Soon one devoted man will go on an unexpected journey that takes readers from fending off crocodiles to  jungle dangers. Of course being shot at is just a normal thing for Charlie Smithers.  Readers will automatically sympathize with the main characeter and be hypnotized by the enchanting story. Fast-paced, well-written, and one novel that will keep readers constantly on their toes and on the edge of their seats. I ejnoyed reading the Adventures of Charlie Smithers and highly recommend to readers everywhere. This is definitely one exciting read.

Review: The Watermelon King

 

Synopsis:

After being laid off from his job at a prestigious consulting firm, Dean decides to embark on a journey across East Africa with his younger brother. Unknowingly, they travel into bandit territory where a medical emergency forces them to choose between their safety and their health.

Inspired by true events, The Watermelon King follows the journey of two brothers as they backpack across one of East Africa’s most inhospitable regions. As they endure endless days of difficult travel, a series of short stories written by their father begins to uncover their inherent desire for adventure and their connection to the past. Along the way, they begin to understand the beauty and frustration of life in Africa.

My Rating: 5 stars

My Review:

The Watermelon King by Daniel Royse is a must read for readers everywhere. Traveling to another continent, finding an adventure of a lifetime, and a little bit of an education read is one that will inspire many readers. This novel will take readers, where many can’t go themselves. It leaves readers with suspense, intrigue, and a passion, to travel. Decisions…can leave major impacts. Dean definitely finds that out as his journey continues. Readers will see the scenes as though they were watching a movie, on screen. Daniel Royse talent for writing is one that will take readers anywhere…he wants. The well-developed yet exciting plot will keep readers turning the pages. Then, there’s Dean’s grandfather whose has left him letters that will have readers falling in love with this spectacular read. I read this entire novel in one sitting. Readers will be happy that they picked this book. The Watermelon King is not just a fictional travel read but a little bit of a memoir too. It’s amazing how this novel can wrap its readers deep into the heart of the story. Overall, I highly recommend Daniel Royse’s novel, The Watermelon King, to all.

Review: Lost in Tanganyika

 

Synopsis:

In 1862, William and Elizabeth Darmon escape from Zanzibar, crossing hostile territory to Lake Victoria. Pursued by ruthless slavers, they flee to Niam Niam country in Darkest Africa. There, William is forced on a desperate mission to save his wife from cannibals. Upon his return, he discovers evidence that she has been sold as a slave to the Arab Rashid family in Hayil across the Red Sea. His chase ends in a disaster beyond imagination, with redemption dependent upon solving Emir Talal’s demise.

My Rating: 5 stars

My Review:

Lost In Tanganyika by Thomas Thorpe is a fascinating adventure novel. One that will lure readers from everywhere. The well-written plot instantly takes readers on a journey of a life time. Danger and suspense hanging in the air, causing a shiver to run down the backs of readers as the characters race against everything to make it back home safe. Or will they?

Thomas Thorpe’s novel, Lost In Tanganyika, is by far one of the greatest reads I have stumbled across. Not only is his story highly entertaining but it also, shows readers the real scary truth about the world. Slavery, war, and even cannibals can be found inside this read. Readers will be left on the edge of their seats as they turn the pages wondering what happens next. The characters, William and Elizabeth as well as their new friend were perfect for this eye opening read. I can’t imagine Lost In Tanganyika without these three believable characters. They make the story pop to life and leave readers falling from their seats into the book itself. Beware, the heart pounding fear and visual scenes will take you on an incredible journey. Overall, I highly recommend this novel to readers world wide.