Tag Archives: cold case

Review: Look for Her by Emily Winslow

Look For Her (Keene and Frohmann, #4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Everyone loves a beautiful missing girl… a gripping psychological thriller that delves into the grief, jealousy, and unresolved mystery surrounding a cold case kidnapping, in the vein of Gilly MacMillan and Mary Kubica.

Just outside of Cambridge, Lilling seems like an unassuming idyllic English village, but it’s home to a dark history. In 1976, a teenage girl named Annalise Wood disappeared while riding her bike home from school. Though her body was later discovered in a shallow grave, the culprit was never found. Decades later, Annalise maintains a perverse kind of celebrity in the small town, and is still the focus of grief, speculation, and for one young woman, a disturbing, escalating jealousy.

When DNA linked to the Annalise murder unexpectedly surfaces, cold case investigator Morris Keene realizes he may now have the chance of his career. Morris and his former partner, Chloe Frohmann, hope to finally solve this perplexing mystery, and bring closure to a traumatized community. But the new evidence that should be the simple solution instead undoes the case’s only certainty: the buried body that had long ago been confidently identified as Annalise may be someone else entirely, and instead of answers, the investigators face only new puzzles.

Whose body was unearthed all those years ago, and what happened to the real Annalise? Could she have had a secret child? Is someone interfering with the investigation? And is there a link to a present-day drowning with eerie connections?

With piercing insight and fascinating twists, Emily Winslow explores the dark side of sensationalized crime in this haunting psychological thriller.

Rating: 4-stars

Review:

Look for Her by Emily Winslow is a living nightmare. One young girl disappears and her cold case connects to a newer one. I found it intriguing. So many questions popped up in how they were connected, who dun it, and etc. Emily Winslow has a way of capturing my interest with every page. Twists and turns kept me guessing the whole way. This novel was definitely a psychological thriller but more of a mystery. The psychological part is where the missing Annalise girl and another by the same name come into play. One is completely crazy…but there’s a story behind that as well. A story within another story. This kept up the edgy vibe and fear factor. The fact that a doctor was easily chilled by her patient, Annalise made goosebumps appear on my arms.

A call comes in…

“I have so much to say next time I see you…” says Annalise.

Then just silence…the sound of the patient breathing on the other end…handing onto the call.

The doctor was the same age as the Annalise girl that went missing years ago.

That only made me more curious. Overall, a great plot worth reading.

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Review: The Flower Girl Murder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Daisy Burns was a likable, devoted wife and mother who spent her spare time volunteering at school events. Everyone loved Daisy. So why would someone shoot her three times and dump her body behind a Planned Parenthood chapter in North Carolina?

With no witnesses and few leads, Raleigh detective Marc Allen turns to the press for help—specifically, veteran news anchor Lancaster Heart. Heart agrees to broadcast the police department’s plea for information in his nightly newscasts.

Elderly viewer and longtime social worker Blanche Avery is positive she recognizes the photograph on the television as an older version of her friend Daisy— the young, heavily pregnant girl she met years before who made the decision to give her child up for adoption.

When Tanner Goochly Jr.—a member of a notorious crime family—becomes the victim of another point-blank shooting, Allen races to discover the connection between the murders. Could it be that Daisy was somehow involved with an illegal enterprise, or was she hiding something else, another secret to be discovered?

The body count is rising, and the suspect pool is widening. As Allen’s investigation reaches a fever pitch, he realizes that a mother’s choice could have killer consequences.

Rating: 4.5-stars

Review:

The Flower Girl Murder by Keith Hirshland is another crime investigation. A murder that goes unsolved until a clue pops up…from there I was hooked. Not everything is what it appeared to be. A young woman who appears to be a decent woman is found dead. No clues as to why or who did it. Then, another body is found and the detective is racing to find out why and how they’re connected. Two murder victims with an apparent opposite lifestyle are now dead. The race to find the killer is exciting. Crime, secrets, and lies keep the detective, Marc Allen busy. But then someone remembers something…and from there all hell breaks loose. There was a lot of action, intrigue, and suspense to keep me entertained. The who done it kept echoing in my mind…guessing happened a lot. Keith Hirshland is a talented writer. He made it impossible to stop reading his book. The detective is a determined fellow who gives his all into solving his investigations. I really liked this character. Overall, this was a great read. I recommend it to all.

Review: Bringing Maggie Home

Synopsis:

Decades of Loss, an Unsolved Mystery, and a Rift Spanning Three Generations…
Hazel DeFord is a woman haunted by her past. While berry picking in a blackberry thicket in 1943, ten-year old Hazel momentarily turns her back on her three-year old sister Maggie and the young girl disappears.
Almost seventy years later, the mystery remains unsolved and the secret guilt Hazel carries has alienated her from her daughter Diane, who can’t understand her mother’s overprotectiveness and near paranoia. While Diane resents her mother’s inexplicable eccentricities, her daughter Meghan—a cold case agent—cherishes her grandmother’s lavish attention and affection.

 

When a traffic accident forces Meghan to take a six-week leave-of-absence to recover, all three generations of DeFord women find themselves unexpectedly under the same roof. Meghan knows she will have to act as a mediator between the two headstrong and contentious women. But when they uncover Hazel’s painful secret, will Meghan also be able to use her investigative prowess to solve the family mystery and help both women recover all that’s been lost?

Rating: 5-stars

Review

Bringing Maggie Home by Kim Vogel Sawyer is beautiful contemporary tale. It also demonstrates a good Christian lifestyle that still is entertaining to read. Inspiring, realistic, and heartfelt. I’m still a huge fan of Kim Vogel Sawyer’s work. Her writing is three-dimensional. Sucks me into her new worlds each time I open up her new novel. A past that haunts one particular family is about to unravel. Bringing back the loss, the mystery, reopening the cold case, and bringing forth an unforgettable emotional journey. Healing, home, and family are major themes incorporated throughout this stunning story. I was hooked. Definitely a page-turner. A disappearance from the past has strong impacts on a family of women. Intense, suspenseful, and addictive. The plot is well-written. Their messy lives are bout to unfold…overall, I recommend this read. I couldn’t stop reading it once I started. Once more, Kim Vogel Sawyer has sown a perfect book. 

Review: The Portrait of Vengeance 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

An unsolved case. A tempest of memories. The future’s at stake—and time is running out…

 

 

Gwen Marcey has done a good job of keeping the pain of her past boxed up. But as she investigates the case of a missing child in Lapwai, Idaho, details keep surfacing that are eerily similar to her childhood traumas. She doesn’t believe in coincidences. So what’s going on here?

 

No one knows more about the impact of the past than the Nez Perce people of Lapwai. Gwen finds herself an unwelcome visitor to some, making her investigation even more difficult. The questions keep piling up, but answers are slow in coming—and the clock is ticking for a missing little girl. Meanwhile, her ex-husband back home is threatening to take sole custody of their daughter.

 

 

As Gwen’s past and present collide, she’s in a desperate race for the truth. Because only truth will ensure she still has a future.

Rating: 4.5-stars

Review:

The Portrait of Vengeance by Carrie Stuart Parks is another brilliant mystery in this exciting series. Gwen Marcey is the main protagonist who is dealing with a lot. She lost her parents at a young age. Now, as an adult she will come close to the killer. The one who killed her parents is trying to kill her and the six missing kids she found. Gwen forces herself into this new investigation. She left the crime scene where her mother was murdered. Gwen will use all of her power to uncover the truth for this cold case investigation as well as save the children…all of the, who are now, counting on her to save them all.

The Portrait of Vengeance is a thrilling rush. Adventure, action, and mystery. Themes of death, loss, and hope are found here. I was hooked. The forensic artist, Gwen Marcey, has her own demons to face as well as the struggle to survive an ordeal. She must conquer the new challenges. Strong, determined, and smart. Gwen is a character to love. I immediately connected to her. Overall, I recommend this entertaining tale to readers everywhere.

Review: A Life Before






Synopsis:

Picture yourself as Mike Strange, a lawyer in 1989 who agrees to represent residents of a large condominium complex, twelve of whom have lost a spouse to lung cancer in the past five years. Surprisingly, all twelve were non-smokers, nor were exposed to second-hand smoke. But all were exposed for years to radon gas emanating from the basements of their condo units. 
As this young lawyer starts ruffling too many feathers to bring those responsible to justice, his wife Susan is brutally murdered by an unknown assailant, clearly as a warning to Mike to back off. For twenty years, her murder has eluded a suspect by the police. 

Only one person seems to have a clue after all this time, a young college student, Samantha Collins, who has recurring dreams of the murder of a young housewife by a tattooed man with a scar on his chin. She has had this dream since she was thirteen, but now in 2011, the dreams are more frequent and include more and more information that place Samantha Collins as the reincarnated Susan Strange from years ago. 

Share the excitement as this one cold case is brought back to life through the vision of Samantha, as the perfect crime may not have been so perfect after all. 

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

A Life Before by Julien Ayotte is an exciting thriller. Right away, I was swept into the book. The characters were believable and the scenes fly by fast. I was completely lost within the pages. There are several cases inside that keep readers like myself guessing. Intriguing, stunning, and well-told. Julien Ayotte is a new writer to watch out for…his words come to life. Danger, excitement, and emotional. Crime happens everywhere. These crimes were entertaining to follow. Overall, I recommend A Life Before to readers everywhere. 

Review: Amelia’s Children

Amelia's Children by [Cribbs, Greta]

 

Synopsis:

In 1985 Amelia Davis is brutally murdered in the woods outside of Laurel Hill. Her killer is never caught. Thirty years later, David Jenson comes to town on what he calls “personal business”, though he won’t tell anyone what that business is. Could he have some connection to the town’s most infamous cold case?

Sarah Hathaway has just returned to her hometown in the wake of a failed acting career. When she meets David, she is immediately drawn to him. But it is the mystery of what exactly brought him to Laurel Hill that keeps her up at night. Determined to find the answer, she embarks on a journey into the unknown that will change her life forever. Along the way, she discovers truths about Amelia’s death that prove more sinister than anyone ever could have imagined.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Amelia’s Children by Greta Cribbs is a fascinating paranormal tale. I loved it from the beginning. Here, readers get involved in the investigation of a cold case murder. From there an unexpected stranger lures a woman into extreme curiosity. A murderer that was never caught…and things about the murder leave more questions than answers…

This novel was well-written. It was easy being sucked into its depth. The characters picked my curiosity as well as the murder mystery. Suspenseful, intense, and addictive to read. The journey was one that readers won’t be forgetting. It felt so real. The danger and paranormal activity were the perfect combinations for this book. Amelia’s Children is indeed an intriguing tale that has captivated me. I loved Greta Cribbs writing style. Her words carried me through her wonderful world of fiction. There isn’t anything better than when the past collides with the present. Overall, this book is highly recommended, to readers worldwide.

 

Review: The Widow

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Synopsis:

When the police started asking questions, Jean Taylor turned into a different woman. One who enabled her and her husband to carry on, when more bad things began to happen…

But that woman’s husband died last week. And Jean doesn’t have to be her anymore.

There’s a lot Jean hasn’t said over the years about the crime her husband was suspected of committing. She was too busy being the perfect wife, standing by her man while living with the accusing glares and the anonymous harassment.

Now there’s no reason to stay quiet. There are people who want to hear her story. They want to know what it was like living with that man. She can tell them that there were secrets. There always are in a marriage.

The truth—that’s all anyone wants. But the one lesson Jean has learned in the last few years is that she can make people believe anything…

Rating: 4 stars

Review:

The Widow by Fiona Barton is an intriguing novel that will grab it’s readers and take them on one of the darkest adventures of all time. I have not yet read Girl on the Train nor Gone Girl. Therefore I can’t say if this novel compares to those titles or not, but I can say that this is definitley a great read for all. In the beginning, readers are basically taken to who the bad guy is…however, there is still the mystery of did this husband really do it or not. Readers will find themselves emersed of the plot as it is retold by three different people. These three people include the wife, a reporter, and a man set out to prove the wife’s husband is indeed the guilty one.

What was truly remarkable was the wife’s reaction to the death of her husband…the way she handles the situation causes moments of why isn’t she sad or afriad…or angry…instead readers will find her hiding away from reporters who want all the juicy details on her dead husband. The Widow is complex, well-written, and it will give readers goosebumps as they read it. Danger, intrigue, a case to solve will lure readers into this brilliant told story by Fiona Barton. I enjoyed reading this steady-paced novel and look forward to reading more by Fiona Barton in the future. Her story telling is amazing. Overall, I recommend this to readers everywhere.