Review: Love’s Dark Door 

Synopsis:

Charlotte is going through the normal difficulties that follow graduation from college: finding a life of her own and a place to work. It is complicated even more when her parents tell her they are going to get a divorce. The divorce makes Charlotte feel depressed, and it seems as though no one can help her at all… until she meets Lane.

Rating: 4-stars

Review

Love’s Dark Door by Julia Bailey is a contemporary romance that is easy to relate to as well as understand. The character’s situation is one that can happen to anyone. Coming home from college, Charlotte finds her parents fighting. They are getting a divorce. That puts pressure on Charlotte. She thoughtby coming home, she could fix their situation. But she soon realizes that she can’t. She soon applies for an interview…and her dad just barely gives her the time of day. Then, upon the interview she reacted in a way that most people wouldn’t for fear of losing a job. But considering the stress she was under it felt right. From there Charlotte gets more than she thought she would. Love’s Dark Door is complicated, messy, and emotional. The ending felt a little cut off…like it was too short or neededa bit more before ending…other than that the book was great. Charlotte goes through a rollercoaster ride as her life changes from negative to positive to negative again. 

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Review: Believing the Lie



Synopsis:

After writing sixteen Inspector Lynley novels, New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth George has millions of fans waiting for the next one. As USA Today put it, “It’s tough to resist George’s storytelling, once hooked.” With Believing the Lie, she’s poised to hook countless more.Inspector Thomas Lynley is mystified when he’s sent undercover to investigate the death of Ian Cresswell at the request of the man’s uncle, the wealthy and influential Bernard Fairclough. The death has been ruled an accidental drowning, and nothing on the surface indicates otherwise. But when Lynley enlists the help of his friends Simon and Deborah St. James, the trio’s digging soon reveals that the Fairclough clan is awash in secrets, lies, and motives.
Deborah’s investigation of the prime suspect-Bernard’s prodigal son Nicholas, a recovering drug addict-leads her to Nicholas’s wife, a woman with whom she feels a kinship, a woman as fiercely protective as she is beautiful. Lynley and Simon delve for information from the rest of the family, including the victim’s bitter ex-wife and the man he left her for, and Bernard himself. As the investigation escalates, the Fairclough family’s veneer cracks, with deception and self-delusion threatening to destroy everyone from the Fairclough patriarch to Tim, the troubled son Ian left behind. 

Rating: 3-stars

Review:

Believing the Lie by Elizabeth George is indeed my first read to this writer’s series. I was instantly hooked from the beginning. Elizabeth George sucked me into her novel. Suspenseful, deep, and intriguing. However, the ending wasn’t what good. The book was like a chocolate cake dressed up to make my mouth water but then when it got to the actual bite, it lacked…that’s how the ending was for me. I wanted Inspector Thomas Lynley to investigate a death … a real death. But instead it turned out to be several other things. Believing the Lie will have readers like me thinking was it just an accident or was there a murder. The ending ruins all that. When it comes to crime fiction, I liked how Elizabeth George created a smoking gun…to lure and and make the bad guys sweat some. Overall, it was good..not the best.