Review: Security by Gina Wohlsdorf

Security

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

“Original and imaginative . . . Ripping suspense, sheer terror, and a wrenching love story.” —Sandra Brown, New York Timesbestselling author of Friction 

The terrible truth about Manderley is that someone is always watching. Manderley Resort is a gleaming, new twenty-story hotel on the California coast. It’s about to open its doors, and the world–at least those with the means to afford it–will be welcomed into a palace of opulence and unparalleled security. But someone is determined that Manderley will never open. The staff has no idea that their every move is being watched, and over the next twelve hours they will be killed off, one by one.

Writing in the tradition of Edgar Allan Poe and Stephen King, and with a deep bow to Daphne du Maurier, author Gina Wohlsdorf pairs narrative ingenuity and razor-wire prose with quick twists, sharp turns, and gasp-inducing terror. Security is grand guignol storytelling at its very best.

A shocking thriller, a brilliant narrative puzzle, and a multifaceted love story unlike any other, Security marks the debut of a fearless and gifted writer.

Rating: 4.5-stars

Review:

Security by Gina Wohlsdorf is an entertaining yet deadly mystery. It kept me guessing. The scenes where it was so obvious that someone did something that couldn’t be brushed off was overlooked. I wondered what would have happened, if the blood scenes were checked and inspected. How many times the hints of something darker were present yet ignored. The intrigue built with every page. Made me curious as a cat. Every moment a murder has been committed it’s been shrugged off by the sheer visibility due to a reasonable excuse of what it could have been. My questions were, wouldn’t a sane person look further into the blood scenes, who was injured, and how did it happen unnoticed? Yet the characters who noticed something did not take it further which added to the intensity of the severe situation. A murderer was loose and able to kill everyone without a single disturbance. Gina Wohlsdorf’s writing caught my eye and kept me reading. I love a good mystery and the frightening story of being watched by someone unknown was creepy as hell. Overall, I recommend this novel to all.

Review: Wonderblood by Julia Whicker

Wonderblood

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

It’s 500 years in the future, and a mad cow-like disease called “Bent Head” has killed off most of the U.S. population. Those remaining turn to magic and sacrifice to cleanse the Earth.

Wonderblood is Julia Whicker’s fascinating literary debut, set in a barren United States, an apocalyptic wasteland where warring factions compete for control of the land in strange and dangerous carnivals. A mad cow-like disease called “Bent Head” has killed off millions. Those who remain worship the ruins of NASA’s space shuttles, and Cape Canaveral is their Mecca. Medicine and science have been rejected in favor of magic, prophecy, and blood sacrifice.

When traveling marauders led by the bloodthirsty Mr. Capulatio invade her camp, a young girl named Aurora is taken captive as his bride and forced to join his band on their journey to Cape Canaveral. As war nears, she must decide if she is willing to become her captor’s queen. But then other queens emerge, some grotesque and others aggrieved, and not all are pleased with the girl’s ascent. Politics and survival are at the centre of this ravishing novel.

Rating: 3-stars

Review:

Wonderblood by Julia Whicker is a frightening, gross, and devastating tale. Loss, grief, and chaos loomed ahead in this read. The world went from how we knew it to one unrecognizable to me. Death. blood, gore, and sacrifice were everywhere. The story was strange. It was worse than any apocalypse novel that I have ever read. I couldn’t tell if they were any heroes, or if they were all just a bunch of lost souls too damaged by the destruction of their world. I would recommend this book if one is into the weird and unforgettable darkness that consumes long time afterwards. Wonderblood was a very dark read.

Review: Goodnight Irene by James Scott Byrnside

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

A brilliant detective…A baffling murder…An isolated manor…A list of less than perfect suspects with perfect alibis…No way out…It’s going to be a long and gruesome night.

Hired to stop a murder at a birthday party of invited suspects at a Mississippi Manor cut off from the world by The Great Flood of 1927, Detective Rowan Manory needs to solve a 20-year-old case to save his client from unwrapping a deadly and perhaps deserved gift of revenge.

Can Manory figure out the identity of the murderer before the bodies start dropping?

‘Goodnight Irene’ is a locked-room murder mystery that will have you guessing until the final reveal.

Rating: 4-stars

Review:

The prologue of this book, made me curious. Death, murder, and mystery are found on these pages. The plot was very interesting. It was mostly steady. The dialogue between characters kept me reading. Like the characters, I too, am a Cub fan. Or was in the past…but now, I do not follow any sports teams. Sometimes, it felt like there wepas more telling than showing what was happening. This caused for a feeling of slowness in spots throughout the book. It seems that clues were left and the detectives find a string of murders that might help them solve a current case. The police have no where to go with the investigation. All suspects have a clear alibi. Goodnight Irene by James Scott Byrnside is similar to the style of Mary Higgins Clark and Michael Connelly. The night a mother checks in her daughter everything changes. The daughter’s life is never the same. Irene’s past comes tumbling to the present, and there’s nowhere to hide…overall, I enjoyed the intrigue and suspense of what happened all those years ago and how they related to the present time. I would recommend this fiction title to readers everywhere.

Review: Mind Me, Milady by Anne Rothman-Hicks and Ken Hicks

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Jane Larson is an attorney on the Upper East Side of New York City, and the Gentleman Rapist has chosen her to receive his calls announcing each conquest. He also reminds her in chilling terms that he will one day twist his wire around her throat and bend her to his will.

Jane has professional and personal problems of her own, but she is forced to try to catch this monster when he stalks her newest client. Susan is a sweet young woman who cannot remember large time periods of her past and who has dreams about a prior life in which she was raped. Soon, the Gentleman escalates to murder, and Jane wonders if he was involved in Susan’s forgotten past, or if Susan is simply a means to get to Jane. Either way, Jane is caught in the deadly game of stopping the Gentleman before another woman feels the wire at her throat and hears his sinister whisper to Mind Me, Milady.

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

Mind Me, Milady written by both Anne Rothman-Hicks and Ken Hicks is the most intriguing women’s sleuth story ever. I was immediately swept into the plot as an evil man was strangling a woman. I love how the writers chose to use action to speed readers through the tale. It was not boring. I kept wondering what would happen next and who would fall victim.

This murder mystery, was suspenseful. It caught my interest right away. A man known as the Gentleman went around raping women. But something changed and he resorted to both rape and murder. The reason why became clear when I got further into the story. Women were being targeted by this crazy killer and it was up to one woman to stop him forever.

Mind Me, Milady carries many themes. These range on rape, survival, psychological fears, and the legal system. I was impressed with Jane. She is the main protagonist and the one who may stop a killer and save other women. Her personality was easy to connect with and overall, I really liked her. Jack is another character that I liked. Jane likes him, too. Madame Rosa is a strange lady. This novel was great! I, recommend it to all.

Review: In the Name of the Family by Sarah Dunate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

`It is better to be feared than loved’ – Niccolo Machiavelli

In the bear pit of renaissance politics, a young Florentine diplomat finds himself first hand observer on the history’s most notorious family – the Borgias.

In the Name of the Family – as Blood and Beauty did before – holds up a mirror to a turbulent moment of history, sweeping aside the myths to bring alive the real Borgia family; complicated, brutal, passionate and glorious. Here is a thrilling exploration of the House of Borgia’s doomed years, in the company of a young diplomat named Niccolo Machiavelli.

It is 1502 and Rodrigo Borgia, a self-confessed womaniser and master of political corruption is now on the Papal throne as Alexander VI. His daughter Lucrezia, aged twenty-two, already thrice married and a pawn in her father’s plans, is discovering her own power. And then there is Cesare Borgia: brilliant, ruthless and increasingly unstable; it is his relationship with the diplomat Machiavelli which offers a master class on the dark arts of power and politics. What Machiavelli learns will go on to inform his great work of modern politics, The Prince.

But while the pope rails against old age and his son’s increasing maverick behavior, it is Lucrezia who will become the Borgia survivor: taking on her enemies and creating her own place in history.

Rating: 3.5-stars

Review:

In the Name of the Family by Sarah Dunate is deep political read. A family swamped with political tension, betrayal, and revenge. A daughter who helps her father as much as her brother tries to destroy their father.  So many themes are found inside this book…it was an adventure of a lifetime. The historical novel captured the time period and politics down perfectly. It felt as though I traveled back in time. There was plenty of action to keep me attention. Murder, corruption, and power were the central themes featured on every page. The children of the Pope felt more like pawns than anything else. The daughter was a pawn for the Pope’s own gain. The son became a hungry Mongolia for more power and influence. The level that each of these three main characters stooped to was engaging as it was sad. Too many viewpoints were told in this book. I would have enjoyed it more if there just two different viewpoints at most telling their side of the story. The historical time period was what made this an entertaining tale. I couldn’t connect with the main characters, which was really disappointing. Overall, good but could have been better.

Review: The Clarity by Keith Thomas

The Clarity

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Dr. Matilda Deacon is a psychologist researching how memories are made and stored when she meets a strange eleven-year-old girl named Ashanique. Ashanique claims to harbor the memories of the last soldier killed in World War I and Matilda is at first very interested but skeptical. However, when Ashanique starts talking about being chased by the Night Doctors—a term also used by an unstable patient who was later found dead—Matilda can’t deny that the girl might be telling the truth.

Matilda learns that Ashanique and her mother have been on the run their whole lives from a monstrous assassin named Rade. Rade is after a secret contained solely in memories and has left a bloody trail throughout the world in search of it. Matilda soon realizes Ashanique is in unimaginable danger and that her unique ability comes with a deadly price.

Rating: 3.5-stars

Review:

The Clarity by Keith Thomas is an interesting read combining fictional elements and nonfictional information together. The frightening parts about experimental portions were based on some real experiences that did really happen to people. The characters were okay. But no emotional attachment that made me want to really connect with them. I thought they were fine but but not were Inwould be talking bout how great they were. The plot was gruesome, dark, and intense as was expected with some of the things mentioned. There was a lot of action in this novel. I would have been happier if there was more to the characters. There needed to be more on the interaction and backstory between/of the characters. It just felt felt flat to me.

The novel did hold a promising tale…Dr. Matilda is by far the worst character. She is a doctor interested in the whole journey of memory and past lives. Yet she wasn’t what I expected and didn’t meet the expectations for her role in this story. There were other characters that I did really like and thought that Keith Thomas did a fine job in creating. Characters like Kojo and Brandon were believable and enjoyable to follow.

The Clarity was fast-paced, action packed, and full of government misuse. Like the medical experiments that still bring a chill down my back. A lot of conspiracy themes are found inside the book. Overall, it was good and suspenseful.

 

Review: The Killing Edge

Synopsis:

Chloe Marin was lucky. She was just a teenager when a party at a Florida beachside mansion turned into a savage killing spree, and she was one of the few to survive. Bloody handwriting on the walls pointed to a cult whose rituals included human sacrifice. Chloe’s sketch of one of the killers linked two dead cult members found in the Everglades to the massacre, closing the case as far as the cops were concerned.

Ten years later Chloe works as a psychologist specializing in art therapy to help traumatized victims, and on the side she finds release in her passion for the martial arts. Police who hire her as a consultant know she’s a literal kick-ass advocate for victims who can’t always speak for themselves.

The current disappearance of a young swimsuit model ranks low on the cops’ priority list. Everyone assumes the girl has run off for some fun in the sun, instead of getting ready for a photo shoot. Everyone but Chloe, who suspects a killer is using the modeling agency to stalk his prey. When the ghost of the model appears, asking Chloe for help, she knows that she has to do everything she can.

So does Luke Cane, a British ex-cop-turned-P.I. investigating the disappearance of the model on behalf of her father. Chloe and Luke have trouble trusting each other, but they can’t help their strong attraction for one another. Luckily they agree on the important things: someone needs to find those missing girls, and if a few laws have to get bent so lives can be saved, too bad.

When Chloe arrives late for an appointment at the modeling agency, she discovers a gruesome mass murder eerily similar to the one she witnessed a decade ago—and can’t help thinking that if she hadn’t run late, she would have been there when the killer arrived. Ten years ago she hadn’t been convinced the police had identified the real killers, and now she’s sure of it. The same evil mind is behind the current murders, and she’s afraid she’s the target— and terrified that she won’t be able to cheat death a third time. She has no choice now but to trust Luke on every level, because with a killer closing in, he’s the only one who’s willing to do whatever it takes to keep her alive.

Rating: 3.5-stars

Review:

Unlike similar novels from this author, The Killing Edge, just did not engage me as much as I had hoped. It was still interesting, edgy, and dark. Murder, bloodshed, and serial killer(s) still out hunting down their victims. I usually feel connected to the main characters but I did not feel connected to these characters. I understood them. I felt their pain and determination to solve the murders. Yet, I was not hooked. I was both intrigued and entertained though. Heather Graham still has the talent for writing novels that ring a chill down my spine. The intensity of the scenes happening in this novel was just as exciting. The plot felt slower to me. I felt like I was moving steady. I usually move quickly through the pages. Just was not happening this time around…overall, it was good. The Killing Edge is worth reading.

Review: The Last Confession of Morten Flygare






Synopsis:

The Last Confession of Morten Flygare is an unnerving suspense thriller narrated by Morten Flygare – multi-lingual translator and multiple murderer. The blood-stained document that comprises the narrative of the novel is his claustrophobic, unreliable account of the murder of Valentina, and the incarceration and death of his drug-addicted sister, Sonia. This is no ordinary confession, however. In a unique and distinctive style, Morten gradually reveals his secret: this story has only one reader, the police inspector he holds responsible for his beloved sister’s death, and that while he writes in the flickering candlelight, he has one last grotesque secret to share that is his ultimate revenge. The Last Confession of Morten Flygare is a ‘whydunnit’ with a twist.

Rating: 3.5-stars

Review:

For those who love super dark reads, this one is for you. Dark, chilly, and full of strangeness. The Last Confession of Morten Flygare is frightening. It sort of reminded me a bit of the Chucky movies and a little of Jack the Ripper. Death, murder, loss are just a few of the themes mentioned inside…Morten Flygare’s writing takes on a darker shade with each passing page. The further I went the more nightmarish it got. The ending surprised me. Different from other thrillers. 

Review:  More than a Slave



Synopsis:

Alexander Anderson has a reputation that would strike fear into the heart of the devil himself. And now, Aria Starbird is his property.

Aria has spent only a few months as a lowly slave, but already her happy childhood memories were starting to fade under the weight of her brutal existence.

When she is sold to Lord Anderson at an auction, she cannot help but be afraid. Lord Anderson is known for his cruelty. He is fiendish and handsome and as wicked as he is wealthy.

However, as she gets to know her new master, she realizes there is more to him than meets the eye. Over time, she is able to penetrate his tough exterior, and begins to understand the struggle of a man who believes love is a weakness, but whose heart is now yearning for something unknown.

As the two let down their walls and discover each other’s truths, will Aria be able to tame Alexander’s inner-beast?

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

More than a Slave by Anaelle Gadeyne is the darkest yet most intensifying read ever. The Hunger Games has nothing compared to this book. This was dark, horrifying, and emotional. So many issues brought up in a clever way. I was intrigued and chilled at the same time. Aria is a young woman who sacrificed herself as a slave to help her parents. They were barely living and no food, no money, and their home would be lost forever. But the moment Aria is a slave her life changes forever. Aria won’t experience happiness for a long time. Seven months of torture by a cruel man. Then she suffers cruel punishment from in public. But her bravery and strength surprises a lord watching it all. Alexander has been know to be feared by all. He kills without mercy. However, seeing Aria…he admires and likes what he sees in her. Fiery, bold, and strong. Not to mention beautiful. Aria sees Alexander Anderson and likes him too. But knowing he’s a monster has her slightly off…soon, fate will bring them both together and each one will change the other’s life around completely. More than a Slave brings up the cruelty shown to human beings. How those who are rich treat those who are below them as well as how and what slaves endured. I was amazed by the emotional force that hit me while reading this novel. I felt sad, angry, and happy. Eventually good does win…Anaelle Gadeyne has a talent for showing readers the ugliness of what occurs in life as well as the beauty of it. Overall, I highly recommend More than a Slave to readers worldwide. 

Review: The Wolf of Dorian Gray



Synopsis:

Complete with adventurous romance, harrowing escapes, hell-bent revenge, and a werewolf terrorizing the gentry; The Wolf of Dorian Gray transcends this classic work of literature into a compelling and most delicious read.

“There on my desk is the first passionate love-letter which I have ever composed in my life–and it is addressed to a dead girl.”

What will happen when the wolf comes to London? Can Dorian save his soul? Or will the beast consume it and his life, along with those of his friends and loved ones?

“The engorged moon hung full and low in the sky like a yellow skull. Misshapen clouds stretched across the floating orb with elongated hands and bony fingers grasping. As they neared the docks, the gas lamps grew fewer and the streets gloomier. The cobblestones blackened as they passed the deserted brickfields. Bottle-shaped kilns spat their outrage with orange tongues of fire into the cooling air. Mangy dogs snarled in hunger and wandering sea-gulls screamed their displeasure at the hansom’s passage.”

This expanded edition of the classic philosophical fiction by Oscar Wilde, features all-new scenes in a compelling tale of love, lust, and the werewolf spawned by the evil of man. The story, set in late 1800’s England, follows the life of Dorian Gray, who through ancient Romani magic’s and the skills of an astonishing artist has had his fate and soul irrevocably linked with the last remaining wolf in the forests of England. Dorian revels in the experiences of first love, delights in the art and beauty of the world, relishes the freedom of his youth, and is awakened to the many pleasures of life. His friend and mentor, Lady Helena, provides a guiding hand as he struggles with his conscience and the purpose of living. Meanwhile, the wolf begins to grow and change into a hideous monster that is ravaging the countryside.

“The wolf had begun hunting human prey. They were plentiful in the dark city streets and provided enough good meat to satiate his gnawing hunger. He was still very careful not to let any who saw him live. To do otherwise would displease the Master. He would only stalk those people that were foolish enough to walk alone in the night.”

Read more at thewolfofdoriangray.com

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

The Wolf of Dorian Gray by Brian S. Ference is a refreshing paranormal read. A werewolf unlike any other. Dorian Gray is human and werewolf. His werewolf form is a devilish soul. Best not to mess with his temper…or else perish like the rest. A young artist captures him in painting. In a way cursing his soul. A savage beast who kills in the night. Rumors spread. Fear is wide. Yet no one really is aware that he’s a monster…

In a way, The Wolf of Dorian Gray reminds me of Frankenstein a bit. Both are monsters. Created monsters. Each one destroys and kills. Haunted and hunted. I found this novel, quite interesting. Fast, suspenseful, and dark. It sent shivers down my back. Brian S. Ference created a stunning piece. His main character sends out fear and leaves readers wondering what next. The danger and the character’s own fear of being found out…left me turning the pages. It was an adventure that I won’t be forgetting…edgy, bold, and entertaining. 

Review: Pigeon-Blood Red

 

Synopsis:

For underworld enforcer Richard “Rico” Sanders, it seemed like an ordinary job. Retrieve his gangster boss’s priceless pigeon-blood red ruby necklace and teach the double-dealing cheat who stole it a lesson. A job like a hundred before it. But the chase quickly goes sideways and takes Rico from the mean streets of Chicago to sunny Honolulu, where the hardened hit man finds himself in uncharted territory when a couple of innocent bystanders are accidentally embroiled in the crime. As Rico pursues his new targets, the hunter and his prey develop an unlikely respect for one another and Rico is faced with a momentous decision: follow his orders to kill the couple whose courage and character have won his admiration, or refuse and endanger the life of the woman he loves?

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Pigeon-Blood Red by Ed. E. Duncan is definitely for fans of The Bourne Series. The tale includes action, danger, and suspense. The intrigue of what will play out entices readers to dig further. Before I know it, the book will have come to an end. Engaging read with choices to make. The characters are well-developed. Their actions are what got them into their present situation. But the hired killer is stuck in a far more pressing matter…kill the couple or to have someone he truly loves killed.The unknown of future events and how the tale will end moves readers into a frenzy to read. I am excited that this is the first of a new trilogy by this talented writer. I can’t wait to read the next adventure. Overall, I highly recommend this read to everyone.

 

Review: The Harvested

The Harvested (The Permutation Archives Book 1) by [Sowder, Kindra]

 

Synopsis:

There are only a few things Mila is afraid of. Most are pretty common fears, but there is one that sets her apart from those around her. The fear of a secret. With one drop of blood, her secret of a power beyond anything anyone had ever seen before is unleashed, landing her in a place where she is a prisoner. And an experiment. And there are only a few that know their dictator’s ultimate goal. Some are willing to save her, others want to exploit her for their own dark and sinister intentions, and it is up to her to stop them before it’s too late.

Rating: 5 stars

Review: 

Harvested by Kindra Sowder is by far her greatest work to date. This urban fantasy sucks readers in fast. The action is thrilling…I felt fear and wasn’t sure what to expect. All I knew was that something bad was about to happen to the main character. Then, just when I thought maybe the fear would subside, the worst happened. Just like the main character, Mila, feared would happen. Sooner or later she knew they would come for her. Because of what she can do. Sleep wouldn’t come knowing that at any moment they were coming for her. Not knowing when nor how adds to the suspense of this spectacular read. I found myself lured deep into this dark world. The unknown keeping me on the edge of my seat…

A girl is soon taken into a facility where experiments and all are done. Mila is soon taken as a hostage and kept on like a lab rat. She has a power that they want from her…the question of who will survive or win this war is something I highly recommend readers to read on their own. Kindra Sowder has a power that is raw and magnetic. Readers will forever be trapped inside of her fantasy world and hanging onto every one of her words. I was deeply satisfied with this brilliantly well-written masterpiece. The desire, no, the need to read her next book, is so strong that it’s incredible. Kindra Sowder can wrap her readers around her finger and keep them hostage in her books. Absolutely, loved this new adventure.  Can’t wait for the next novel. Overall, I highly recommend this page turner to all. Harvested is definitely a must read for all.

Review: Rise of the Chosen

 

Synopsis:

In Sam’s world, there are two rules. Rule #1: Nobody dies. Protect the living at all costs. Rule #2: Everybody dies. At least once.

The Waking was a global event in which a force called the Lifeblood invaded all humans who died. The few strong enough to control it came back as powerful immortals. The rest let the bloodlust take over and awoke with one goal – to kill.

Newly appointed Watch Guard Samantha Shields has a legacy to uphold. Her father died a hero defending their city and now she wants to follow in his footsteps. Except for the dying part, of course. Unfortunately, fate has other plans as she discovers deep dark secrets that make her choose between her loyalties and the lives of everyone in her city. Both rules are in play as Sam is forced to make hard decisions that could cost her everything – including the person she cares about most.

Rating: 4 stars

Review:

Rise of the Chosen by Anna Kopp is intense. There are the dead,  and the dead who walk. Then, there’s an army of individuals set on protecting the innocent. One young woman lost her dad and then her mother. After the loss of her mother, Sam was promoted to the highest level of fighting. Her boyfriend ends up being killed but issues out a warning to her. Then, she and her new teammates are preparing to fight a battle. One that is about to break out and only time will tell what happens next.

Rise of The Chosen was well-written. The main character, Sam, is a lesbian. So there’s plenty of F/F action happening. The tale is fast-paced. Packed with tons of action, tough choices, and fighting. Death is everywhere inside this novel. Losing the only family Sam had is a tough emotional journey. Then she also loses a past boyfriend that she cared about like a friend. Work is tough especially when the leading female didn’t have time to prepare or work her way up to the highest level. Lots of science fiction fantasy themes can be found in this exciting read. Anna Kopp is a talented writer. I was fascinated by her book about the dead and the war at hand.

 

Review: The Reader of Acheron

 

Synopsis:

Book One of the Slaves of Erafor series: Reading is forbidden, and the penalty for non-compliance is a life of slavery enabled by the forcible administration of a mind rotting drug. Yet, there are those possessed of the will to seek illumination. Kikkan, a former slave on the run, and Quillion, a mercenary and self-taught scholar. Together they seek out a small band of rebels living in hiding who offer the promise of a better world. Their leader is a mysterious figure known only as The Reader of Acheron.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

The Reader of Acheron by Walter Rhein is by far the most intriguing novel of its kind. Here, readers are introduced to a world where reading is forbidden. Many of us would die of shock hearing these world from our own government if one day this were to happen. Just reading the first sentence brings readers minds into a swirl of possibiites oh why, how, and who would make reading forbidden…I was definitely intrigued with that statement.

Inside this novel, readers will meet military men and men who have been turned into zombies. Those who read are taken as slaves and put on a drug that melts their brains and when they become so weak, they are let loose into the wild. It is then that they turn into these frightening zombies. Zombies that need the drug called Bliss to keep going…but instead go after other humans…if one of their own has been slaughtered…they eat him alive. Hence zombies is a correct term to describe the horrors, dangers, and suspense of this novel. The Readers of Acheron takes readers on an intense journey that will leave them on the edge of their seats, their palms sweating and their hearts pounding with fear. The anticipation of what is to happen next will keep readers turning this mind blowing read. Overall, I enjoyed reading this fantasy and look forward to the next book. Walter Rhein’s writing is suspenseful and vivid. His talent is amazing. I highly recommend The Readers of Acheron to readers worldwide. Beware once you open it, you will be plunged into one of the most dangerous worlds of fiction…

 

Review: The Slient Dead

Synopsis:

When a body wrapped in a blue plastic tarp and tied up with twine is discovered near the bushes near a quiet suburban Tokyo neighborhood, Lt. Reiko Himekawa and her squad take the case. The victim was slaughtered brutally—his wounds are bizarre, and no one can figure out the “what” or the “why” of this crime.

At age twenty-nine, Reiko Himekawa of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police’s Homicide Division is young to have been made lieutenant, particularly because she lacks any kind of political or family connections. Despite barriers created by age, gender, and lack of connections, she is mentally tough, oblivious to danger, and has an impressive ability to solve crimes.

Reiko makes a discovery that leads the police to uncover eleven other bodies, all wrapped in the same sort of plastic. Few of the bodies are identifiable, but the ones that are, have no connection to each other. The only possible clue is a long shot lead to a website, spoken only in whispers on the Internet, something on the dark web known as “Strawberry Night.”

But while she is hunting the killer, the killer is hunting her… and she may very well have been marked as the next victim.

Rating: 5 stars

Review: 

The Silent Dead by Tetsuya Honda is a thriller that will leave readers feeling cold with fear. An inside gateway to what the killer thinks and feels sends shivers down my spine. The dead are piling up, and the killer isn’t satisfied unless there’s constant bloodshed. Every bloodshed means the killer feels the world is not grey…and when it feels grey there’s bound to be another killing. The suspense is overwhelming.  Readers will find themselves buried deep in the case along with the female lieutenant. But the killer isn’t far from her heels…

Tetsuya Honda’s writing is clever, frightening, and suspenseful. Every page brings readers closer to the danger at hand. A killer that kills because the world is much better then when there’s no killing…no fighting.  The feel from the first kill sparked something into the insane, unstable killer whom a female lieutenant, Reiko, is out to catch. A strong independent woman who has a way of solving cases. Little does she know this one will take everything she has to solve or it might be too late. I also enjoyed the companionship that Reiko shares with an older doctor. Their friendship is refreshing and the family life, of Reiko’s, is an interesting one that many readers can easily relate to…Overall, I highly recommend The Silent Dead to readers everywhere.

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