Review: Kamikaze White Noise




Synopsis:

Kamikaze White Noise is a collection of three books by Nicole I. Nesca, The Sexual Repression Collection, Kink and Canned. Though not a formal trilogy, the books were written as companion pieces and follow the themes of sexual freedom, emotional frankness and street-carnival logic, all written with Nicole Nesca’s usual free-flowing sardonic wit. Kamikaze White Noise is prose and poetry that assaults the sense, liberates the mind and celebrates life on the edge like a perfect quarter-mile drag race.

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

Kamikaze White Noise by Nicole I Nesca is a brilliant collection of poetry. The poems words create a billion emotions swirling in my mind. As I read further, I was pulled deeper into the bold free verse. Unlike anything I’ve read. Each piece had its unique message that branded me. The words flowed easily. Not once did they feel forced nor strained. Exciting. I found many themes hidden in each poem. I loved it. Nicole I Nesca is definitely one poet I would watch for….her poetry is beautiful. Overall, I recommend Kamikaze White Noise to readers worldwide. 

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Meet, Poet, June Marie Davis…


 



ULM: What inspired you to write Reflections of a Soul?

 

 JMD: I was told that I couldn’t and that I wouldn’t amount to much by a close relative. So I did it, I wrote a book.

 

ULM: How long have you been writing poems?

 

JMD: Since I was a teenager, 12 or 13 years old.

 

ULM: Which of your poems inside Reflections of a Soul was your favorite?


JMD: They all have a special sentiment to me, but if I had to choose I would say there are two that are my favorite. “I AM”, which is the last poem in the book is an empowering poem about being who you are, being proud and accepting of that.  

 

“Daddy’s Little Girl” is the first poem to open the book and I chose that poem because it was something that I never experienced as a child. My mom did an amazing job raising my brother and I as a single parent, but the not knowing what my father was like was always a curiosity to me.

 

ULM: Are there more poems you have written besides the ones inside your latest book?

 

JMD: I do have more poems, and I try to write often. Writing is cathartic for me, most times I just write down what or how I’m feeling and I wont go back to it for days or weeks later.

 

ULM: How would you describe your writing using only three words?

 

JMD: Simple, Contemplative and Flawed. 

 

ULM: Do you have more works coming out soon? If so, can you share with us, readers, what those will be and when they’ll be published?

 

JMD: I have some works in progress. I’m working on a children’s book and another book, but I’m not quite sure of its format just yet. I am hoping by the end of the year to have one or both books published.

 

ULM: Have you published other volumes of poetry?

JMD: My first poem was published when I was 16 years old in a book with varies poets, but Reflections is my first book.

 

ULM: What advice would you give to other poets?

JMD: I would say to never give up on yourself and never let any one person keep you from your destiny. If you want to write, write. Your words are worthy of being read.

 

ULM: Where can readers find your work online?

 

JMD: Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Inkwater Books

 

 

Author Brittany Weekley – The Secret Life of Thomas Commons

Author Brittany Weekley – The Secret Life of Thomas Commons
I never thought I would be writer. I wrote poems and attempted a novel at the age of 14, but it quickly ended when I entered high school. I wouldn’t write again until I was in my mid-20s.

​I viewed a writing career as many others did, unpractical. I worked low paying jobs, quit college, and focused on a future that seemed so bleak. Then, something in me changed. I broke the chains that society had me trapped in, and I started my first novel, The Secret Life of Thomas Commons.

​From the moment I began writing Thomas, I have found it difficult to explain his story. I can never do his story justice through a simple five minute explanation. The themes and the issues that my characters go through in this book simply have to be read from Thomas’s perspective to be fully appreciated. Although I am the creator, it felt like I was falling away from that position. My characters seemed to take on a life of their own; they became their own person with my help.

​The idea for this book came to me after seeing the changes taking place within our society. The hardships endured today made me curious about the hardships people would have faced centuries ago. The more research I did, the more horrified I became. There were days I would weep for the innocent lives lost because of a lack of understanding and compassion.

​How the ending of this book is interpreted depends on the reader. It’s not the traditional happily ever after. I chose to do this because it’s crucial to highlight the importance of the reality of their situation as well as those who lived through it centuries ago. To put it plainly, life is cruel. We don’t always get what we want, and in the end, that can shatter the human spirit. However, not all is lost. As we have all heard more than once, with the bad comes the good. Things may not turn out exactly how we wish them to, but those hardships can lead us down a path of learning, acceptance, and necessary change.

Author Interview with John Sibley Williams 

Author Interview with John Sibley Williams 



 

Me: How does it feel to be a five-time Pushcart nominee? What were your thoughts?

I am honored to know so many magazines and presses believe in my work. It’s always a bit of a shock, but the joy never diminishes.

Me: After reading Disinheritance, a collection your poetry in one brilliant book, what inspired each piece? Or inspired you to write the poems?


Disinheritance was inspired by a few pivotal moments that occurred within a few months of each other, namely the illness and passing of my mother, a terrible miscarriage, and my wife and I’s struggles to move forward and redefine the landscape of “family”. To explore grief more fully in this collection, I adopted various unique voices, like those of our miscarried child, the hypothetical boy he might have grown up to be, my mother in her last moments, and my wife as she struggled to cope.
 

So Disinheritance shows a far more personal side than most of my poetry, though I hope the poems speak to larger, universal human concerns about how we approach mortality and what roles we play in each other’s’ lives.

Me: I noticed that you have written several other anthologies. Can you share with us, readers, what the titles are of those anthologies?


Sure. My other full length collection is Controlled Hallucinations. It was published in 2013 by FutureCycle Press. Before that, I had a number of chapbooks published through various presses.

Me: Is it difficult to put an anthology of poems together?



Absolutely. I have always struggled with organizing my poetry collections. Which poems should be included? Which cut? How to organize them to create a feeling of cohesiveness? Are there poems you love, perhaps that have even won awards, that simply don’t match the themes of the collection as a whole? Most collections go through a series of revisions before reaching a point where the poet feels comfortable submitting them to publishers. And if enough publishers reject it, the question becomes: what have I done wrong? What can I revise to strengthen it?

Me: Using three words, how would you describe your most recent anthology of poetry, Disinheritance?



Lyrical. Heart-breaking. Honest.

Me: Would you highly recommend writers to submit their works to places to win awards?

That’s a good question. I’ve read numerous articles about the pros and cons of submitting to awards, and both arguments make valid points. For example, it’s true that awards can be costly (often between $10 and $30 per submission), and these costs can add up quickly. It’s also true that any poem or book is up against hundreds (or thousands) of others, so competition is fierce. However, if you win or are nominated for an award, that does carry significant weight; award-winning authors tend to be taken more seriously by publishers and readers, and, of course, most awards carry substantial cash prizes. So it’s a mixed bag.

 My recommendation for emerging poets and writers is to hone your craft before spending money on contests. Submit first to magazines and acquire a number of notable publications. Once enough editors have shown interest in your work, then perhaps it is contest-worthy. That is not to say new authors without publication experience aren’t amazingly talented. But, as writers, we tend to have a skewed opinion of our own work. I’ve been submitting to contests for most of my writing life, winning one or two a year at most. Those years, I spent far more on submissions than I made back on prize money. Only recently have I consistently won enough awards to financially warrant the expense. However, it’s not about finances. The bottom line is not money so much as exposure. If you love your work and have spent decades honing it, in the end, I would argue it’s worth the time, effort, and expense to submit to contests.

Me: You have won several awards and credits. How does this affect your job as an editor?



I’m not sure if my own accolades, or those of my co-editor, per se affect our editorial work. Hopefully it gives authors who submit to our magazine some confidence in our ability to select powerful poetry, but many of our published authors have similar awards and credentials. 

Me: Out of all of your poems, which three are your top favorite?




I honestly can’t say which of all my poems resonate the strongest with me, but in Disinheritance the three poems that still make me tremble when I read them are “I Go to the Ruined Place,” “Teething,” and “A Dead Boy Speaks to His Parents.” 

Me: When did you first begin to write poetry? 



I’m lucky to have been passionate about books since childhood. Perhaps it’s in part due to my mother reading novel after novel over her pregnant belly every day. Perhaps it’s in part due to my own restlessness, my need to make things, and my love of words. But I began writing short stories in middle school, and I continued in that genre until my early twenties. A handful of those stories found publication in literary magazines, which was eye-opening and oddly humbling.

 I was 21 when I wrote my first poem. Before that, I had never enjoyed reading poetry and had certainly never considered writing one. It was summer in New York and I was sitting by a lake with my feet dragging through the current caused by small boats when suddenly, without my knowing what I was doing, I began writing something that obviously wasn’t a story. What was it? Impressions. Colors. Emotions. Strange images. I didn’t have any paper, so I used a marker to write a series of phrases on my arm. Then they poured onto my leg. Then I realized I needed paper. I ran back to the car, took out a little notebook, and spent hours emptying myself of visions and fears and joys I don’t think I even knew I had. That was 17 years ago. Since that surreal and confusing moment by that little city lake, I’ve written poetry almost every day.

Me: What was the first award you won for your outstanding writing skills?



Gosh, it was so long ago that I must apologize if I get the details incorrect. But I believe the first time my work was honored with an award was about twenty years ago, when I was eighteen-years-old. One of my prose pieces won Best Short Story in the undergraduate magazine Voices. I still remember the shock and honor of discovering something I created actually resonated with strangers. I hope I never forget that feeling.

Me: Do you have any works in progress at the moment, if so, can you share it with us, readers?


I have two upcoming collections, both quite different in styles and purpose. I recently completed a chapbook titled Skin Memory, which combines free verse and prose poetry to explore human connects and disconnects as they relate to culture and family. The other project, which I’m currently working on, is titled Road to the Sky.

Me: What tips would you share with other poets?




There’s a reason “keep writing, keep reading” has become clichéd advice for emerging writers; it’s absolutely true. You need to study as many books as possible from authors of various genres and from various countries. Listen to their voices. Watch how they manipulate and celebrate language. Delve deep into their themes and characters and take notes on the stylistic, structural, and linguistic tools they employ. And never, ever stop writing. Write every free moment you have. Bring a notebook and pen everywhere you go (and I mean everywhere). It’s okay if you’re only taking notes. Notes are critical. It’s okay if that first book doesn’t find a publisher. There will be more books to come. And it’s okay if those first poems aren’t all that great. You have a lifetime to grow as a writer.

 Do we write to be cool, to be popular, to make money? We write because we have to, because we love crafting stories and poems, because stringing words together into meaning is one of life’s true joys. So rejections are par for the course. Writing poems or stories that just aren’t as strong as they could be is par for the course. But we must all retain that burning passion for language and storytelling. That flame is what keeps us maturing as writers.

Me: Where can readers find you and your work online?



Thanks so much for asking. All my books are available via the usual online shops and in plenty of independent bookstores, though I have far more information, including newly published poems, on my website: https://johnsibleywilliams.wordpress.com.

Review: Simply Faulkner

Simply Faulkner by [Weinstein, Philip]

 

Synopsis:

Nobel Laureate and two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner William Faulkner (1897–1962) was one of America’s greatest and most celebrated writers, whose work reflects and, at the same time, questions the South’s most deeply held values. His novel The Sound and the Fury is frequently cited as one of the best books of all time, and all of his works powerfully explore complex societal and family issues that continue to be relevant in our own day. Yet, because of his decidedly difficult, stream-of-consciousness style, Faulkner’s books remain sadly unknown to many readers.

In Simply Faulkner, author Philip Weinstein not only helps us understand these challenging works, but also explains why Faulkner had to write them as he did, in an effort to capture the sheer abundance and unruliness of life. Further, in his exploration of the author’s own colorful life—including decades of working for a film industry he despised—Weinstein reveals a fascinating connection between Faulkner’s troubled personal biography and his groundbreaking fiction.

The goal of Simply Faulkner is not to simplify the author, but, rather, to create a framework that allows us to comprehend him in his own idiosyncratic way. It strives to show us the real Faulkner—warts and complications and all—and to demonstrate why his brilliant masterpieces still speak to us in a deeply meaningful way.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Simply Faulkner by Philip Weinstein is an exploration into Faulkner and his life as he grew up in the South. Faulkner took what was happening around him and his feelings on these matters and portrayed into his poetry and fiction. The time periods of when Faulkner was born and where he grew up deeply shows readers why Faulkner wrote the way he did. This was book was a great way to dive into the famous writer’s life, background, and history. The writing was super easy to understand and follow along. Faulker instantly became more than just a mastery legend writer. Here, he became a man growing through and witnessing life as we know it to be. His frustrations at the lie around him clearly popped up within all of his writings where he could share them with the world. Simply Faulkner is a brilliant nonfiction book. Both education and entertaining. I was immediately fascinated with Faulkner, his writings, and his background. Philip Weinstein has woven a journey that readers will take part in time after time. Truly an unforgettable portrait of a well-known writer and poet captured in this book. Overall, I highly recommend this read to readers everywhere.

 

Review: Uncharted

Uncharted by [Renson, Jennifer]

 

Synopsis:

Welcome to the unknown and unexplored in “Uncharted”, Jennifer Renson’s third book of poetry. Prepare to dive deep into the thoughts and dreams of several lives from a leader struggling to keep his group alive, to a dark horse deserving of a title, a lovesick London man, a water sprite, a man worthy of being called a Prince, and men of liberty.
From tale to photograph be immersed in times almost forgotten as you trek through the uncharted roads ahead of your life.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Uncharted by Jennifer Renson is a short collection of poems that readers everywhere can enjoy. Easy to read. Absolutely an enjoyable array of poems to keep readers lured. Each poem is beautifully written. The words are very descriptive and send you into the images that are portrayed by each sentence. Jennifer Renson is a talented poet whose poetry engulfs readers completely. Swallowing me whole. I felt the raw intensity of the emotions as I read through each page. Uncharted is the third book containing Jennifer Renson’s best poetry. I love reading her work. Overall, I highly recommend Uncharted to readers worldwide.

 

Review: Eo

 

Synopsis:

“Eo” latin for “go, walk, ride, sail, pass, travel” is N.J native Jennifer Renson’s second book of published poetry. Leave your world behind and go on a journey through time and place.

In “Eo”, we return to post-apocalyptic Georgia where we follow a father and his thoughts about his son while an odd radio transmission is broadcasted. Friends follow a circus, as another returns home to the ideal cottage, and a spectator watches a world of creatures from a window in the clouds. Readers enter the minds of several characters in their own worlds while exploring others. Smell the ocean air, absorb the sun and spend some quality time with the moon.

As a special surprise, the readers get to add their personal touch to the book. Stuck in traffic? Play a little tic-tac-toe. Traveling to somewhere new? Write it down and paste the pictures. Draw the constellations you feel from the plane window. Turn your daydreams into a poem of your own or two.

Whether you travel by plane, train, bus, car, boat, horse, bicycle or foot, you can carry, inspirational and delightful poetry with you. Paperback and lightweight, this poetry book is ideal for all of your travels. Even if you are simply taking some time to yourself, be sure to take Jennifer with you.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Eo by Jennifer Renson is a brilliant collection of well-written poems that automatically lured me deep into her words. Stunning how tiny black words on a page pop off the pages and becomes scenes filled with action, adventure, and emotion. When reading this collection of poetry, I can sense the deep inspiration coming off the pages and being absorbed by me with every flick of a page. Endless beauty, inspiration, and raw talent shine within this book. As a reader, I felt, myself drawn into other places. Every word felt like it was my own…that openness and raw form of writing by a poet is one that can’t be ignored. It beckons and calls me deeper into its heart. Jennifer Renson can take me anywhere and make me feel anything all with the magic of her words.If readers look closely they will recognize Walking Dead themes within the wonderful book.  Eo is not just a book of poetry but packed with a lot of other surprises to keep readers like myself, busy reading. Overall, I highly recommend this title to readers everywhere.

 

Review: When Pain Has Stained A Peaceful Heart

 

Synopsis:

Ann Henry had a close-knit family, a normal childhood, and a strong sense of identity. Although she had been healthy for most of her life, at the age of 27, she was stunned to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder. And so began a fifteen-year journey regaining her mental health, despite the many pitfalls of our mental healthcare system. When Pain Has Stained a Peaceful Heart is based on the true story of Ann’s devastating loss—the loss of her sanity, her voice, and her dignity—and how she fought to regain control over her life with courage and faith. In poetic form, Ann shares the trauma of her experiences in the mental health system through the rhythm of her words and the depth of her emotion. This is an important book not only for those in the mental health profession but also for those who suffer from mental illness and their families by providing an insider’s view of the often chilling reality of treatment facilities. When Pain Has Stained a Peaceful Heart is honest, hard-hitting, and beautifully expressed. “Ann Henry leaves me questioning our mental health system and the further damage done to individuals in an attempt to ‘help’ them and their families.” —Cynthia Barrios-Woodward, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. Ann Henry wrote When Pain Has Stained a Peaceful Heart in an effort to help shine some light on the realities of the mental health system. As an artist, writer, and now author and poet, Ann opens up and shares some of her deepest wounds in an effort to help educate the general public about atrocities within a system meant for care.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Ann Henry is indeed a talented writer and poet. Her words will capture readers’ attention from the first page. The words envelope around the readers and drag them through the journey that Ann Henry has brilliantly written. The emotional experiences, from reading When Pain Has Stained A Peaceful Heart, is phenomenal. Inside this beautiful read, readers will find one woman’s voice using poetry to tell her heartbreaking story. One that involves mistreatment within our mental health system.

This book is not a fictional piece but a real woman’s journey through a difficult time in her life. Ann Henry’s poetry flows in a way that lures readers further into her tale. Can you image having your normal life suddenly taken from you  at the age of 27? Well, Ann Henry did. Her mental health took a nose dive and the treatment she received only plunged her down further. Fifteen years of working on regaining her life again…is a sad, yet remarkable read. Ann Henry suffered but made her way through the hardships life dealt her. A strong independent woman who serves as a reminder and inspiration to readers everywhere. I can’t remember a time when a piece of poetry grabbed my attention the way this book has…When Pain Has Stained A Peaceful Heart is definitely a must read for all. I highly recommend reading this woman’s story.

Author Interviews Coming Soon!

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Universal Creativity Inc. will be conducting author interviews from the following authors:

Ryan Hill – YA Author

Nadia Gerassimenko – A Poet

JT Ellison – Thrillers/ Myster Author

Laura Griffin – Crimes/ Suspense Author

Bruce Henderson – Historical Author

Author Interview: Victoria Warren Jackson

Victoria Warren Jackson Responds to the Interview Questions

  1. How old were you when you wrote your first book? And what was the name of that book?

I cannot remember the exact age, but I do recall writing a short story about a young girl who lived on a farm. I was in the third grade. I did not give this book a title, but I was so pleased with my work because my mother read it and asked me questions about the main character.

  1. How many novels have you written so far?

I have written two novels and one poetry book.

  1. Which is more enjoyable to you, writing poetry or writing fiction novels?

I enjoy writing fiction more than writing poetry because I have more opportunities to develop the plot, climax, and conclusion of the story.

  1. I noticed that one of your novels has a silver medal from Reader’s Favorite with the rating of five stars. That is the highest honor to receive from that company. How did you feel when you received that medal for your novel?

I was so happy. At first, I did not believe it. I closed my email and re-opened my email to make sure there were no technical errors. I also checked several other websites to actually read the review. This honor makes me very proud.

  1. On your author website you have stated that writing is therapy. Why do you think writing is a form of therapy and how so?

Writing is therapy for me because I can relax, evaluate certain situations from my own life, make sense of what is happening currently in the world, and forget any stressors from the day.

  1. What advice do you have for other novelist wanting to write in the same genre as you?

I would advise the novelist to read my books or other books written in their preferred genre to give them ideas on how to organize their book. Next, I would advise the novelist to get to work, and do not give up!

  1. Do you think that being an educator for at-risk youth has helped shape your form of writing? Why or why not?

Teaching has helped me grow as an author. The students I have taught in the past and my current students have shaped my writing style, word choice, and my selection of the audience. Some of my poems reflect experiences I had with students and parents. Being an educator requires me to be flexible and open-minded, which has helped me to step outside the box with my own writing. Working with at-risk students requires patience and understanding. The writing process is a challenging effort requiring a whole lot of patience especially when publishing and marketing the book. My students are creative, and they challenge expectations when necessary. Over the years, my students have asked me questions about grammar and mechanics. I learned it is a choice to follow grammar rules. For instance, I decided not to follow grammar rules with the title of my book Untraditional Love In The Dark. I knew what I wanted to see in print, and regardless of grammar rules, I just followed my heart.

  1. Can you tell us readers a little bit about your novel called Not Just Us

Desiree and Shanna are sisters. They both lived similar lives, but Desiree becomes infected with HIV. With two children, a caring sister, a supportive mother, and a new boyfriend, Desiree’s world could be perfect. The fear of dying from AIDS stands in the way of Desiree’s happiness. For Shanna, life will never be the same.

  1. Which of the two sisters is your favorite character from Not Just Us?  And why?

My favorite character is Shanna. I like her because she steps up during a difficult time to support her sister. She also decides to become the adoptive mother of her sister’s children after her sister dies. Shanna is the perfect example of how family love links lives.

  1. Can you tell us a little bit about your novel Untraditional Love In the Dark?

Samantha learns a valuable lesson about self-love after Isaiah, her future husband, jogs into her life one windy morning. On the rebound, Samantha marries Isaiah to later discover he has a violent temper. He is physically abusive, lazy, and has a naughty secret. Samantha is about to face the fight of her life when she discovers Isaiah is bisexual. As her life unravels, Samantha faces death and must triumph over adversity to rebuild her life. The conclusion is a definite surprise.

  1. What inspires you to write your poetry? And what three words would you use to describe your poetry?

I am inspired by family, friends, love, life, and everyday experiences.  I get my rhythm from these topics. The best three words to describe my poetry are encouraging, soothing, and vibrant.

  1. What is the name of your fourth novel? And when will it be coming out?

The title of my fourth novel is Maricella. This book will be released in Spring, 2015.

  1. Can you tell us readers about your fourth novel?

The main character, Maricella, retells the details of her life in a dramatic story. Maricella is sentenced to death row after murdering an innocent woman during a brief stay in a shelter.

  1. Where can readers find your novels?

All of my books can be purchased on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com

 Click on the link below to watch the trailer o her new book.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73AtQi77w74