Review: Burnt Orange by Meiah Shaun

Synopsis:

A coming-of-age story of Erin and Erika, Texas twins in an abusive home in a town segregated by white and black color lines, who are wounded by the revealing of a shocking family secret and long to escape their circumstances and erase what they have been labeled. Follow their journey in this compelling novel filled with inspiration and triumph.

Rating: 4-stars

Review:

Burnt Orange by Meiah Shaun is an interesting read. The characters felt so real. I can feel their troubles grow as the pages fly by me. Two sisters, twins, live in a black and white community. A place where there is a lot of racial tension. One twin, holds a lot of hope for the world. Her view is simple. Move away from their town if it’s so bad to live within…yet, her family stays and blames the white man for the lack of good jobs. The father isn’t my favorite character. I think he could be better towards his girls. This book is an emotional journey that will keep readers like myself hooked. Wondering what happens to the twin girls, Erin and Erika. The life they girls live is a difficult one. Yet they find some happiness. I liked how their grandmother, Momma, instilled good Christian values to the girls. She’s a comfort to have and they love her. I respected her. Overall, Meiah Shaun is a great writer. Her words come to life among her pages. Overall, I recommend this novel of hers to readers everywhere.

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Review: The Monk Woman’s Daughter

Synopsis:

This eye-opening and entertaining first novel paints a vivid picture of the rough-and-tumble of 19th century urban America. Vera St. John is a resourceful girl growing into an unconventional woman. She comes of age through the wild streets of New York City, the quiet rural village of Flatbush, the mob violence of Baltimore, and the turmoil of Washington City during the Civil War, struggling to make her way out of poverty. All the while she hides an explosive secret: she is the daughter of the “infamous Maria Monk” one of the century’s most notorious women. Vera sees her world with irreverence and insight, and comes to learn about the corrosive nature of power, the importance of freedom, and the real meaning of belonging. 

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

The Monk Woman’s Daughter by Susan Storer Clark is a historical mystery with a lot of suspense. Keeps readers like myself entertained. The historical parts to this fictional tale was well-researched. I felt like I stepped back to that particular time period. Susan Storer Clark brought up a lot of strong issues that were faced back then into her novel. That was interesting…it felt a little bit like an educational journey but in the most exciting way. One theme was centered around women. How they dealt with the life they were given or stuck within…like the main character, struggling with the weight of her parents. The Monk Woman’s Daughter is an intriguing tale that I recommend all to read. 

Review: 12 Signs that You have the Poverty Spirit

Synopsis:

Many people are living with a spirit that robs them of accruing money and finances. They have a financial problem and can’t recognize the signs that they are living with a spirit that is draining them. Once you can see it, you can correct it in a few easy steps. Diagnose the financial disease and get cured! Start saving money and do things to keep it. I have observed many people with this same problem and they all exhibit the same patterns and choices…

You don’t have to live with the …Poverty Spirit. Form wealthier habits!

Rating: 5-stars

Review:

12 Signs that You have the Poverty Spirit by Hope A Christian is a great nonfiction book. It brings awareness among those suffering from poverty spirit. Poverty is a long lasting relationship that is difficult to get rid of…and this book helps to only recognize it, but to leave it behind. 

Review: The Glorious Heresies 





Synopsis:

From Lisa McInerney, hailed by The Irish Times as “arguably the most talented writer at work in Ireland today,” comes The Glorious Heresies, a searing debut novel about life on the fringes of Ireland’s post-crash society.

When grandmother Maureen Phelan is surprised in her home by a stranger, she clubs the intruder with a Holy Stone. The consequences of this unplanned murder connect four misfits struggling against their meager circumstances. Ryan is a fifteen-year-old drug dealer desperate not to turn out like his alcoholic father, Tony, whose feud with his next-door neighbor threatens to ruin his family. Georgie is a sex worker who half-heartedly joins a born-again movement to escape her profession and drug habit. And Jimmy Phelan, the most fearsome gangster in the city and Maureen’s estranged son, finds that his mother’s bizarre attempts at redemption threaten his entire organization.

Biting and darkly funny, The Glorious Heresies presents an unforgettable vision of a city plagued by poverty and exploitation, where salvation still awaits in the most unexpected places.

— New York Time’s Book Review’s “10 Best Crime Novels” of the year.

Rating: 4-stars

Review:

The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney is quite a read. There’s a lot of realistic issues happening within the plot. The charcaters have tough struggles that can send their worlds spiraling downward. Ranging from drugs to sex plus violence, their worlds are full of chaos. They want different lives yet live in paths that keep them where they are or send them down further than where they originally planned to be. Four misfits each with a different issue. Readers will get an insider’s view to the world’s ugliness and how those living these lives try to survive their outcomes. The Glorious Heresies is definitely a dark yet deeply complex story. This world stayed in my mind long after reading reading it. Unforgettable scenes. Overall, I recommend it to other readers.

Review: Child of the River


Synopsis:

A compelling coming of age story with an unlikely and utterly memorable heroine, Child of the River is a timeless tale of heartbreak and triumph set in South Africa at the dawn of apartheid.

Persomi is young, white, and poor, born the middle child of illiterate sharecroppers on the prosperous Fourie farm in the South African Bushveld. Persomi’s world is extraordinarily small. She has never been to the local village and spends her days absorbed in the rhythms of the natural world around her, escaping the brutality and squalor of her family home through the newspapers and books passed down to her from the main house and through her walks in the nearby mountains.

Persomi’s close relationship with her older brother Gerbrand and her fragile friendship with Boelie Fourie—heir to the Fourie farm and fortune—are her lifeline and her only connection to the outside world. When Gerbrand leaves the farm to fight on the side of the Anglos in WWII and Boelie joins an underground network of Boer nationalists, Persomi’s isolated world is blown wide open. But as her very small world falls apart, bigger dreams become open to her—dreams of an education, a profession, a native country that values justice and equality, and of love. As Persomi navigates the changing world around her—the tragedies of war and the devastating racial strife of her homeland—she finally discovers who she truly is, where she belongs, and why her life—and every life—matters.

The English language publication of Child of the River solidifies Irma Joubert as a unique and powerful voice in historical fiction.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Child of the River by Irma Joubert was a remarkable read. The talent of the writer was phenomenal. I couldn’t stop reading the novel. The tale inside was so captivating…that I kept on turning the pages. I had to know what happened and how and the why. A young girl grows up in South Africa. Her family is beyond poor. In fact, they live off another’s farm for work. The house is tiny only two rooms. A stealness over bears the senses. The roof barley holing up, and then there’s the dark stuff that happens inside the home. A step-father who bullies his wife and kids. As long as Persomi’s older brother Geraband was there. She was safe from her step-father. Her life gets more interesting. She is soon told by Geraband that their father isn’t their real father. Both share the same mother but different dads. Just as Persomi comes to this idea. She is then set on finding out who her father is. 

But then fate takes an interesting twist. Persomi is soon a lead witness against her step-father and Geraband goes to war as a solider thus providing food and money for Persomi and their mother. With these new events happening, Persomi’s life changes forever. She, a dirt poor girl, is soon excelling as fast or faster than the kids who can afford to go to school. Persomi wins scholarships to pay for her high school education. At first the kids don’t like her, because she’s poor, and because of her step-father. But then Persomi ends up winning awards for the best girl in sports. Her grades are good and she makes a new friend Beth. Beth is a girl raised by a reverend and his wife, after her mother died. Both Beth and Persomi have no idea who their fathers are. Persomi is still working on that revelation. However, Irma Joubert keeps readers in suspense. The revelation comes in when readers least expect it. I was surprised at first, but it made sense. I liked how Persomi succeeded despite being humiliated due to a stigma and how she continued to prove to others how wrong they were of her. Persomi’s dream of being a lawyer may work out…love, friendships, betrayal, death, loss, and hope are all tied beautifully inside this read. I loved it. Child of the River is a must read for all. A new historical tale that should be a new classic. Lessons learned and highly entertaining. I was deeply engaged from the beginning to end. Irma Joubert’s novel is the best I have read in quite awhile. OveralL, I highly recommend it to all. 

Review: Tiny Tim & the Ghost of Ebenezer Scrooge

 

Synopsis:

In the sequel to Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Tiny Tim, now a grown well-to-do young man, builds to a crisis of faith after he loses his love and soul-mate years earlier. It all comes to a head when old Scrooge, his benefactor, friend, and second father dies just days before Christmas. Blaming God and rejecting Christmas, Tim slips more and more into an uncaring mood with only a tenuous need to live on. Scrooge’s ghost now returns to show Tim what he does not understand about true faith when bad things happen to good people. Tim is shamed by an example of real faith and finally begins to understand what Christmas really means in Tiny Tim and The Ghost of Ebenezer Scrooge, The sequel to A Christmas Carol.

Rating: 5 stars

Review:

Norman Whaler has brilliantly written a sequel to the famous A Christmas Carol. Inside this stunning tale, readers find themselves lost in Tiny Tim’s world. The world is very much like our own. Poverty and suffering all around. This time, however, Tiny Tim is suffering the loss of two great people in his life. Ebenezer Scrooge comes back as a ghost to Tiny Tim. His message is that he came back because three people need help right away and Tiny Tim must come with him. Tiny Tim, bless his heart, doesn’t hesitate to go with Ebenezer Scrooge.  So the journey begins…lessons are learned and it’s another heart-melting tale that readers won’t ever forget. I enjoyed following Tiny Tim’s new adventure as the story unfolded. This is a new classic that will become everyone’s new favorite Christmas tale. Overall, I highly recommend this beautiful piece to readers everywhere. Tiny Tim and the Ghost of Ebenezer Scrooge is definitely a must read for all.